Author Topic: how to check for full cure (plastisol/dc/wb)  (Read 3242 times)

Offline ericheartsu

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how to check for full cure (plastisol/dc/wb)
« on: April 01, 2015, 09:51:42 AM »
As i start researching more and more about the inks we use, and our dryer settings, I'm wondering what the best way to check for full ink cure.

What are some key ways to make sure that inks (plastisol, waterbase, and discharge) are fully curing. I'm especially interested in Waterbased curing, if anyone has any insight!
Night Owls
Waterbased screen printing and promo products.
www.nightowlsprint.com 281.741.7285


Offline blue moon

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Re: how to check for full cure (plastisol/dc/wb)
« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2015, 10:01:10 AM »
yup, only one way to make sure it's unquestionably right. . . wash the shirts!!!

pierre
Yes, we've won our share of awards, and yes, I've tested stuff and read the scientific papers, but ultimately take everything I say with more than just a grain of salt! So if you are looking for trouble, just do as I say or even better, do something I said years ago!

Offline Frog

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Re: how to check for full cure (plastisol/dc/wb)
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2015, 10:04:56 AM »
Fellow old timers, was it Wilflex that used to publish a great booklet that was pretty much like an oversize "pocket-pal" handbook for the fabric printing industry?
It contained a test for plastisol cure utilizing some solvent that we didn't ever have.

However, Pierre is right with washing (up to six times) still being the standard.
That rug really tied the room together, did it not?

Offline jvanick

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Re: how to check for full cure (plastisol/dc/wb)
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2015, 10:11:10 AM »
It contained a test for plastisol cure utilizing some solvent that we didn't ever have.

Charlie talks about that stuff... Cellosolve or Ethoxyethanol

we were considering buying some from a local chemical distributor until we found out how bad it is.

it absorbs directly through your skin, and targets reproductive organs, blood, kidneys and your liver... you're also not supposed to breathe the vapors...

it's also super combustible.

sounds like great stuff to have around the shop and let employees use.

much easier to just wash the shirts ;)

Offline Orion

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Re: how to check for full cure (plastisol/dc/wb)
« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2015, 10:39:07 AM »
Wash test is your best bet.

I do have a Wilflex color guide and textile users manual here in my office. Page 91...

Dale Hoyal

Offline mimosatexas

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Re: how to check for full cure (plastisol/dc/wb)
« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2015, 10:39:32 AM »
I've never been burned that I know of after checking with laser temp and doing a stretch test on the first few test prints after the dryer has warmed up to full.  If it fails the stretch test typically it will fail a wash test.

Offline tonypep

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Re: how to check for full cure (plastisol/dc/wb)
« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2015, 10:40:21 AM »
Crock meter

Offline Itsa Little CrOoked

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Re: how to check for full cure (plastisol/dc/wb)
« Reply #7 on: April 01, 2015, 11:05:46 AM »
I've always read about the "crock test" but for some reason have never really looked into it.

Crock Meter and Crock Test.

Are they the same thing?
« Last Edit: April 01, 2015, 11:19:14 AM by Itsa Little CrOoked »

Offline ericheartsu

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Re: how to check for full cure (plastisol/dc/wb)
« Reply #8 on: April 01, 2015, 11:08:29 AM »
Crock meter

i know i've asked before, but best place to buy a crock meter?
Night Owls
Waterbased screen printing and promo products.
www.nightowlsprint.com 281.741.7285

Offline blue moon

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Re: how to check for full cure (plastisol/dc/wb)
« Reply #9 on: April 01, 2015, 11:40:59 AM »
Tony had an extra one up in his attic (from all the shops they buy out) and I picked it up for peanuts. I don't think I've seen them on ebay, but Tony might have another one left. . .

pierre
Yes, we've won our share of awards, and yes, I've tested stuff and read the scientific papers, but ultimately take everything I say with more than just a grain of salt! So if you are looking for trouble, just do as I say or even better, do something I said years ago!

Offline Hey Monkey

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Re: how to check for full cure (plastisol/dc/wb)
« Reply #10 on: April 01, 2015, 12:26:58 PM »
Once it is dialed it then a wash test is the best way. Once I wash a certain brand of shirt and it comes out ok I tend not to wash text anymore. But if new brand or method than I do a short run and wash them to check.

Offline Screened Gear

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Re: how to check for full cure (plastisol/dc/wb)
« Reply #11 on: April 01, 2015, 01:37:29 PM »
Pull test, rub test and even a pressure wash test can find a under cured shirt. Wash test by your customer is the only test that counts. That's the one that costs you money.

Everyone measures the temp of their dryer in the tunnel like the "pros" tell you. They say test the ink film when the heat element is on. If you use a temp gun, donut probe or heat strips you know your dryer gets to the temp. I stopped doing this a long time ago. I have a quartz dryer. The heating elements pulse on and off. This makes taking the temp not the easiest. You can get temp readings plus/minus 20 degrees. I know heat guns are not the most accurate for this use. When your taking the temp your exit gate has to be open. This also throws off the heating chamber. What I do now is take my temp reading 6 inches out side the dryer. This gives me a very consistent reading and it is also very easy to take at any point during the run. I have done wash tests and every kind of test and I have never had any shirts come back. Taking your temp this way you get the temp only coming from the heated ink. When you take the temp in the tunnel you get heat from the tunnel that is bouncing off the ink and shirt. My way your only getting the cooked in heat temp coming off the shirt and ink film. Now the temp that I look for maybe lower but if the temp is at my goal temp I know the cure temp had to be met in the dryer chamber. Not saying its for everyone but for my shop it saves tons of time and is more accurate.

« Last Edit: April 01, 2015, 03:33:17 PM by Jon »