Author Topic: IC Legacy White non-phthalate  (Read 12843 times)

Offline ScreenFoo

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Re: IC Legacy White non-phthalate
« Reply #45 on: May 15, 2015, 01:48:59 PM »
A lot of this could have to do with how you set your flood bars on the white head--I tend to push them in at least a little against the screen--if they are above it by any margin, that will change how it floods, in some cases quite a bit...

Zoo--as far as the ink shelf life goes, I have been told more than once that the resins will absorb plasticizer, increasing the viscosity of the ink as it gets old.  It usually gets reduced, and is good enough to print easily, but is not of the same quality as fresh ink.

Hopefully the answer is wrong:since this is the internet, someone should very nearly instantly correct me.  :)


Offline Colin

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Re: IC Legacy White non-phthalate
« Reply #46 on: May 15, 2015, 02:59:57 PM »
Resins need a heat source to absorb Plasticisers.

Example: If you are in the mid west in summer with average temps in your shop over 100 each day for a string of days..... that can be considered a heat source, but it can take months for it to become an issue.

If you are in the pacific northwest and it gets to maybe 90 for a few weeks each year.... that is not a heat source.

Also, this will only be a potential issue with FAST FLASHING whites and maybe low cure inks.  I do not have any real info on heat stability on low cure inks.

Remember, you have plastisol that has been sitting around for years that is still very usable.
Been in the industry since 1996.  5+ years with QCM Inks.  Been a part of shops of all sizes and abilities both as a printer and as an Artist/separator.  I am now the Ink and Chemical Product Manager at Ryonet.

Offline ScreenFoo

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Re: IC Legacy White non-phthalate
« Reply #47 on: May 22, 2015, 12:16:30 PM »
I didn't catch this right away--good work!  It only took an hour.  ;)

Interesting points on the amount of heat being key. 

I was always under the impression that heat was heat, and no matter what temp you were at (maybe only above freezing,) that it would increase in viscosity at rest and printing--eventually.